How to Capture Lovely Details with a Camera

by Tammy Strobel on March 2, 2012

Henry

Yesterday, I received an email from Polly who asked:

“Why type of camera do you use? What’s your photo-taking process? And how do you capture such lovely images?”

Since I’ve received similar inquiries in the past, I thought it would be fun to share my response with you.

My Tools

I have two cameras, a Nikon D5000 and my iPhone camera. I bought my Nikon D5000 about four years ago and love it. I use the kit lens frequently, but I also have a 50mm lens for portraits. The 50mm lens is amazing because it picks up so much light! For instance, I’ve been able to get beautiful shots of my cats in very dark closets.

In addition, my iPhone has a lovely little camera. It’s a wonderful point and shoot that’s lightweight. Also applications, like Instagram, make it easy to share photos on networks like Twitter and Facebook.

The Process

1. Take photos. Typically, I take 20 to 50 digital pictures everyday of the landscape around me, people, and my pets. I love taking pictures because I can share how I see the world one moment at a time, frame by frame.

2. Upload to Lightroom. After taking photos, I plug my camera into my computer and upload the images to Adobe Lightroom for processing.

3. Delete, edit & process. Once I upload photos to Lightroom I delete, edit, and process my images. Blurry shots are the first to go, then I start looking at photo composition and the subtle differences between each shot. Sometimes I adjust the exposure and clarity and other times I don’t process photos at all. It depends on the quality of my images. After I’m done editing, I’m left with one to five decent shots for the website.

4. Export & upload to the Internet. Once I’m done processing the image, I export it from Lightroom and upload it to the blog. Typically, I pair an image with each article I post on RowdyKittens. I also send photos to friends and upload them to Instagram and Flickr.

Parting Words . . .

When started taking pictures, I was disappointed by my shots because they were horrible; 99% of the images were blurry and the composition sucked. As I snapped photos, I kept Henri Cartier-Bresson quote in mind. He said, “Your first 10,000 photographs are your worst.”

In my experience, I’ve found that to be true. If you want to get better at photography keep taking pictures. Take photos of scenes that capture your interest and don’t over-think the process. For example, I’m really into macrophotography and I love to take close-up shots of flowers and water droplets.

As Matt Hardy said, “Beauty can be seen in all things, seeing and composing the beauty is what separates the snapshot from the photograph.”

Get out there are start capturing lovely details with your camera!

Be well,
Tammy

Previous post:

Next post: