Minimalist Make-up and Beauty

by Tammy Strobel on February 4, 2010

In my former life, I was a make-up queen. I was also very insecure and constantly worried about how I “should” look. Thinking back, this mind set was a waste of time, energy and money. Don’t get me wrong, I like looking good. But looking presentable doesn’t have to cost a lot of cash or damage one’s self-esteem.

Below are 3 strategies that helped me take my make-up off for good.

1. Buy less and love yourself.

Advertising promotes the idea that women “need” make-up, and anti-aging creams, to fit into a “conventional image”. Don’t believe this message. Instead, start buying and using less make-up.

At one time, I thought I needed make-up to look good. I finally realized I was slowly killing myself with negative thoughts. Living a simpler lifestyle has taught me to consider the impact of my choices. Rather than spending $50 (or more) every month on make-up, I’m putting that money in my savings account. It took me years to realize I don’t need to “look” a certain way. I’m finally comfortable in my own skin.

2. Be aware of chemical additives in your products.

If you wear make-up be aware of the chemicals and additives in your products. Do some background research and question the products you apply to your body. Some questions to consider asking yourself include: Has your product been assessed for safety? Does your make-up contain carcinogens? Is your body absorbing make-up through the skin? The Good Guide posted an informative article on this topic:

Check the ingredient list for most makeup, from blush to lip plumper, and you’ll find “fragrance”, a trade-secret blend of chemical ingredients that often conceals strong toxins like phthalates and is often associated with allergies and immune system toxicity. You’ll also sometimes find the immune and organ system toxin, wildlife toxin, and possible carcinogen BHA, a masking agent found in lipstick, lip gloss, eye shadows and eyeliners. (BHA is banned for cosmetics use in the European Union due to health concerns.)

Foundations, concealers, mascara and other eye makeup often contain micronized titanium dioxide, a colorant, sunscreen agent, and possible carcinogen that opens up your skin to allow other chemicals to get in better and, because of its small size, is an inhalation risk.

Continue reading here.

3. Use a tiny make-up bag.

I use a very small personal care bag. Before I discovered small living, I carried around a small suit case that contained my make-up and hair products. Yikes! By purchasing a small personal care bag, I slowly limited the amount of personal care products I bough and carried with me on trips and to the gym.

A few thoughts…

These strategies worked really well for me. But in the end you have to decide what makes you happy and brings balance to your life. Wearing make-up isn’t a bad thing. If it adds joy to your life, apply away, but don’t buy additional products because you feel like you should “look” a certain way or have to conform to societal pressures.

Do you have anything to add?

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